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This Week's Mix Is Imported From Detroit - Meet Cruce Grammatico


Today we bring you a young DJ, filmmaker and digger (the universal word for a serious record collector) and fantastic talent in Cruce Grammatico who resides in Detroit. His new mix "A Cry 4 Dub" takes the tempo down a notch and gives us a cross genre experience that will make your day.

This Week's Mix Is Imported From Detroit - Meet Cruce Grammatico

by Herb Essntls

3 months ago


News

This Week's Mix Is Imported From Detroit - Meet Cruce Grammatico


Today we bring you a young DJ, filmmaker and digger (the universal word for a serious record collector) and fantastic talent in Cruce Grammatico who resides in Detroit. His new mix "A Cry 4 Dub" takes the tempo down a notch and gives us a cross genre experience that will make your day.

by Herb Essntls

3 months ago


This Week's Mix Is Imported From Detroit - Meet Cruce Grammatico

Today we bring you a young DJ, filmmaker and digger (the universal word for a serious record collector) and fantastic talent in Cruce Grammatico who resides in Detroit. His new mix "A Cry 4 Dub" takes the tempo down a notch and gives us a cross genre experience that will make your day.

Check out his SoundCloud page here. We also want to extend our thanks to our good friend Tim Overill who has been conducting the interview, definitely worth a read. 

Tim earlier made a mix for us which you can find here.

What mood are you looking to set with this mix?

For this mix, I picked a handful of downtempo jams, all favs of the last six months or so. A combination of burners from Detroit, the UK, and elsewhere summarizing my pent up quarantine energy below 100bpm, with excessive tape delay.

Any particular standout records you’d care to mention? What does it take for you to make a deep connection with a particular song?

The stand-out for me is easily the 3rd selection, an elusive 7” by the name of ‘Morning Love’ by Carlos Williams, originally “discovered” by the infamous Michael August. Ghost records like this always kill me on how something can so perfectly fulfill the needs of my ’sound’ but lack so much context of who made it and where it came from outside of the name ’Steve Reynolds’ and ‘Sonic Research Records’ (all of which return nothing on Google) and the fact that it was pressed in Houston. Although my father was a detective for 25+ years I’ve yet gain the skills necessary to learn more about these outsider artists who’ve affected me so deeply. Beyond that my connection to individual songs usually revolve around the people and places in which I experienced them most intensely, most commonly between the hours of 4am and 7am.

You are part of a wider (global) community of diggers. With the proliferation of digital, what still compels you to hunt the physical medium of vinyl?

I’m definitely down with digital and feel no need to gate keep how anyone experiences music but most of what I’m looking for only came out on vinyl. I treasure records as historical artifacts, kind of like a small window into someone’s life at a singular moment in time.

What formative experiences set you on the path to collecting records, and how has this changed over the years?

My deepest and most powerful influential experiences are all parties in Detroit featuring local DJs like Theo Parrish, Marcellus Pittman, Bill Spencer, Ryan Spencer, Stingray, Scott Zacharius, FIT Siegel, Kenny Dixon Jr., Nicole Misha, Mike Servito, Carlos Souffront, Isabella Diblassio- I could go on… This huge variety of curated sounds and styles is my bible for what I aspire to and how I want to make people feel. As far as my own early experiences of playing, it was the generosity of my peers letting me onto the decks at house parties and being instantly hooked on the (cliched & classic) power of a shared experience through music on the floor. I am most grateful to Bill Spencer for teaching me how to beat-match and going out of his way to loan me his Vestax mixer and decks early on. This experience speaks to the good-hearted sharing nature of the scene and what made this accessible to me personally.

Filmmaking has been something that you’ve been involved in since a young age - documentary to commercial work. How does working with sound design from a commercial standpoint connect and impact your DJing and digging?

I’ve worked as a Production Sound Mixer in film and television since I was expelled from high school freshmen year. It’s literally the only thing I know how to do! It’s certainly sharpened my ears but outside of that my journey with music has been very separate.

Record collecting, digging, DJing…you showcase an incredible variety of music and genres in your mixes and dj sets - what is the unifying thread in making those musical connections?

For me the unifying thread is more tonal than any defined genres. My mix jumps around quite a bit because I have a short attention span and love hearing unexpected juxtapositions. This style is commonplace amongst my idols and inspirations.

Detroit has been a musical mecca since Motown's golden years, through to its pivotal role in the birth of electronic music. How does the identity of the city impact your own musical journey?

My introduction to music is entirely accredited to moving here as an impressionable teen and serendipitously falling into a circle of a loving and accepting group of people who shaped my idea of community and music as a means of therapy and survival. I must make it clear that I’m a newcomer and cannot speak to the foundations of Detroit music or attempt to adopt the identity of the people who are truly responsible for this movement. I would highly recommend learning more about Detroit from the perspective of the people who are from here.

The therapeutic aspects of celebrating music communally is a point referenced more than once in this series. How important is this today?

A dance floor represents the anti capitalist ideal of doing something for your own well being outside of being productive or making a profit. Dance music is as necessary and important to me as any other facet of staying sane.

 

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